Lime Bruschetta

SONY DSCShockingly you might have guessed that today’s recipe includes tomatoes. My garden is crazy productive right now and I have six tomato plants. This recipe has been a favorite of mine this summer. It’s quick and easy to make and it just tastes like summer to me. Mike and I eat it on a fairly regular basis. We also LOVE the bread I make it on. It’s a garlic roasted ciabatta bread baked fresh every three days and found at my local grocery store. I always hated “garlic bread” growing up. You know that cheap bread with the bright yellow garlic-y super oily sauce that covered the cheap bread? That stuff made me gag. In fact it’s because of that bead that I always thought I HATED garlic. It wasn’t until I went vegan and started using it in recipes that I realized that I actually love the taste of garlic.

This recipe is my take on a classic recipe. Not only is it incredibly easy and delicious, but it’s healthier than traditional bruschetta. I make mine sans olive oil and salt, which is considered a traditional part of burschetta. Can I even call it bruschetta then? That’s up to you. Let me know what you think!

Word Origin: Bruschetta is a noun derived from a Roman verb bruscare which means “to roast over coals”.

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Chunky Tomato Sauce

I was honestly surprised at how easy it was to make amazing tomato sauce. Rago and Prego have nothing on homemade sauce.

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This is also the recipe I used when learning how to can. Canning is a little scary because nobody wants botulism, but if you make sure to do it correctly canning is really rewarding. My source for correct canning procedure comes from here. Obviously if you’ve never canned before please read up on it independently as it’s very easy to do improperly.

Canning Fact: The canning process changes lycopene in tomatoes to a more usable form for the body to utilize. Lycopene is a pigment found in many red fruits and vegetables. It is an antioxidant that helps protect cell damage and there is research suggesting it helps prevent some cancers.


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Hearty Tomato Soup

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So, you might be asking yourself why I would post a recipe on hot soup in the middle of the summer. But really, it’s because if you grew tomatoes at all in your garden this year then you’re getting pretty sick of making tomato sauce and salsa. It’s time to mix it up!

This recipe is perfect because all the vegetables are in season and thus are more affordable, then after you make it you can store it in the freezer until fall rolls around.

Personal Fact: I actually successfully grafted a tomato plant this past March. The scion (top part) is an heirloom variety, and the root stock (bottom) is just a regular more hearty variety. It’s currently producing tomatoes the size of softballs in my garden and they’re delicious.


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Tomato Tofu Scramble

 So if you’re like me and you grew tomatoes in your garden this year and you’re trying to think of something else to do with your tomatoes besides sauce and salsa, this recipe can use up one large tomato or a handful of little ones.

 

Or maybe you’re just normal.

 

Whatever. Either way it’s yummy.

 

Tofu scramble was one of the first meals that I made/tried as a vegan. It’s one of those meals that if done right makes you so not miss the disgusting unfertilized egg embryo everyone else is consuming.

 

Plus, tofu itself has some incredible health benefits. It’s high in protein and calcium (Two of the biggest nutrition related questions I get) and it’s cholesterol free.

 

Fun Fact: Soy beans are ground up, cooked, and separated into two parts, the pulp (called Okara) and the milk (used for milk and tofu). Okara is considered a by-product of tofu/soy milk and is mostly used as feed for animals. Though it can be used as fertilizer because of it’s high nitrogen content. A small portion of its usage is for human foods. For example, it can be used to make tempeh.